Gallery visits 1

Was walking in South London and realised I was near the White Cube which I’d never visited, so I popped in. The main artist on show was Chuck Close who has done a lot of prints, big impressive expensive prints. The work is extremely well done and is interesting as an exploration of the possibilities of the medium but as art which evokes emotion it left me cold. The main feeling I got from this gallery was that this is what wealth looks like. It seemed more interior design showroom than curated art gallery, (there was some kind of sub-artschool installation with a guy in tights on rollerskates- the least said soonest forgotten) The most interesting thing in this gallery was the fact that they use the Americanism washrooms. This is south London – who says that?washrooms

washrooms at the whitecube – R.Megawhat

I left here and went to a small gallery I had been invited to a while back and had been meaning to visit the Cul-de-sac gallery which is currently showing POINT AT A DEER AND CALL IT A HORSE .

horse deer
Stephen Hall & Ren Li Li  – Point at a Deer and Call It A Horse 2013

This was a tiny gallery with just 2 small rooms – one pictured above, and the other with about 9 simultaneous video works. Some of these works were extremely good but the proximity of so much video, most of which had conflicting audio was a drawback . This show deals with some interesting aspects of Chinese culture best read about  here 

The forced intimacy with the stuffed horse is scary and powerful. It left me wondering what happens between the small gallery with passion and the large soulless whitecube.  Would the Horse have lost its power in a larger space? – Or was the curation in the tiny back street gallery just a lot stronger?

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One thought on “Gallery visits 1

  1. An interesting look at how the exhibition space affects the artwork. As regards your final remarks, I think that the white cube space as gallery is becoming more and more redundant. Although it allows an artwork to be viewed without any visual distraction, I think it takes away some of the emotion of an artwork.

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